Contaminated land

Some areas of residential red zone land may be contaminated with hazardous substances that could pose a threat to human health or the environment.

Land may be contaminated if it has previously been used for a hazardous activity or industry. Examples of a hazardous activity or industry include: service station, transport depot, sheep dip, engineering workshop, landfill, bulk fuel or chemical storage, and orchards or market gardens where persistent pesticides have been used.

Where hazardous substances have not been used, stored or disposed of safely, the soil can become contaminated. In the past, the use of hazardous substances was not as well controlled as it is today. Sometimes this contamination is still present many years after a land use has ended. Hazardous substances that may be present in the soil many years after the previous land use has ended include persistent pesticides (such as DDT), heavy metals (such as lead and arsenic), asbestos, solvents, petrol and diesel.


Hazardous activities and industries

A list of hazardous activities and industries, known as HAIL, is available on the Ministry for the Environment's website. Land where a listed hazardous activity or industry has taken place is referred to as HAIL land.

Hazardous activities and industries list [on MFE's website]


Potentially contaminated land in Christchurch

The Listed Land Use Register (LLUR) is a publicly available database that identifies sites where hazardous activities and industries have been located in Christchurch and throughout Canterbury.

Environment Canterbury has identified these sites and maintained the database for some years. They sped up the process after the Canterbury earthquakes because people rebuilding houses, repairing foundations or repairing earthquake-damaged land (all of which means soil is disturbed) should know about potential contamination before starting work.

The LLUR data contains sites where past or present land uses have a known potential to contaminate land. The actual presence of hazardous substances can only be confirmed from soil sampling and laboratory analysis.

There are also likely to be other sites for which no data exists that are contaminated or could potentially be contaminated.

Environment Canterbury's contaminated land information

Christchurch City Council's contaminated land information

Some areas of residential red zone land may be contaminated with hazardous substances that could pose a threat to human health or the environment.

Land may be contaminated if it has previously been used for a hazardous activity or industry. Examples of a hazardous activity or industry include: service station, transport depot, sheep dip, engineering workshop, landfill, bulk fuel or chemical storage, and orchards or market gardens where persistent pesticides have been used.

Where hazardous substances have not been used, stored or disposed of safely, the soil can become contaminated. In the past, the use of hazardous substances was not as well controlled as it is today. Sometimes this contamination is still present many years after a land use has ended. Hazardous substances that may be present in the soil many years after the previous land use has ended include persistent pesticides (such as DDT), heavy metals (such as lead and arsenic), asbestos, solvents, petrol and diesel.


Hazardous activities and industries

A list of hazardous activities and industries, known as HAIL, is available on the Ministry for the Environment's website. Land where a listed hazardous activity or industry has taken place is referred to as HAIL land.

Hazardous activities and industries list [on MFE's website]


Potentially contaminated land in Christchurch

The Listed Land Use Register (LLUR) is a publicly available database that identifies sites where hazardous activities and industries have been located in Christchurch and throughout Canterbury.

Environment Canterbury has identified these sites and maintained the database for some years. They sped up the process after the Canterbury earthquakes because people rebuilding houses, repairing foundations or repairing earthquake-damaged land (all of which means soil is disturbed) should know about potential contamination before starting work.

The LLUR data contains sites where past or present land uses have a known potential to contaminate land. The actual presence of hazardous substances can only be confirmed from soil sampling and laboratory analysis.

There are also likely to be other sites for which no data exists that are contaminated or could potentially be contaminated.

Environment Canterbury's contaminated land information

Christchurch City Council's contaminated land information