Cultural, archaeology and heritage

In this almost-3 minute video Dr Christine Whybrew of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga talks about acknowledging heritage in future land use in Christchurch.


Mana Whenua / Ngāi Tahu cultural history

Ōtautahi | Christchurch lies within the Takiwā of Ngāi Tūāhuriri who exercise Rangatiratanga and Kaitiakitanga over the wider Christchurch area [1].

Ōtautahi is of high significance to Ngāi Tūāhuriri and also Ngāi Tahu whānui due to historical occupation, use of natural resources and numerous occupations to sites of significance.

Traditionally Ōtautahi was used for Mahinga Kai, trade, occupation and transport. The historical and current values within the residential red zone and wider areas are based predominantly on Mahinga Kai, Wāhi Taonga and Wāhi Tapu.

The connection between land and water and also to the wider area is of high value to Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri. Ongoing protection and enhancement of the natural resources and the related connections within Ōtautahi to other outlying areas is of significance for current and future generations. These values should be considered as part of any future planning of the flatland residential red zoned areas within Ōtautahi. The Statutory Acknowledgement Areas are identified in the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998. A Statutory Acknowledgement enables Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and any member of Ngāi Tahu Whānui to cite statutory acknowledgements as evidence of the association of Ngāi Tahu to the statutory areas.

For more detailed information:

[1] Rangatiratanga: dominion; chieftainship; right to exercise authority; chiefly autonomy; chiefly authority; ownership; leadership of a social group; domain of the rangatira; noble birth, attributes of a chief meaning authority or rule.

Kaitiakitanga: active protection, guardianship and use of and responsibility for natural and physical resources in the environment.

[2] This document should be read in support of the text in the technical area summaries.


Archaeology and heritage

The Replacement Christchurch District Plan identifies historic heritage places and settings which represent cultural and historic themes and activities of importance to the district. Significant historic heritage places with a high degree of authenticity and integrity are listed on a schedule and are subject to rules or provisions that protect them from inappropriate subdivision, use and development.

Archsite is the national inventory of archaeological sites for New Zealand. It incorporates information from the New Zealand Archaeological Association’s Site Recording Scheme. This is a “live” inventory that up-dates as new data is fed in from archaeologists working in the field. The data includes archaeological sites, known archaeological areas and indicative archaeological areas.


For more detailed information for eight areas below, see the Initial Heritage Assessments prepared by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

There is also some information in the technical area summaries on our land information page.

In this almost-3 minute video Dr Christine Whybrew of Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga talks about acknowledging heritage in future land use in Christchurch.


Mana Whenua / Ngāi Tahu cultural history

Ōtautahi | Christchurch lies within the Takiwā of Ngāi Tūāhuriri who exercise Rangatiratanga and Kaitiakitanga over the wider Christchurch area [1].

Ōtautahi is of high significance to Ngāi Tūāhuriri and also Ngāi Tahu whānui due to historical occupation, use of natural resources and numerous occupations to sites of significance.

Traditionally Ōtautahi was used for Mahinga Kai, trade, occupation and transport. The historical and current values within the residential red zone and wider areas are based predominantly on Mahinga Kai, Wāhi Taonga and Wāhi Tapu.

The connection between land and water and also to the wider area is of high value to Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri. Ongoing protection and enhancement of the natural resources and the related connections within Ōtautahi to other outlying areas is of significance for current and future generations. These values should be considered as part of any future planning of the flatland residential red zoned areas within Ōtautahi. The Statutory Acknowledgement Areas are identified in the Ngāi Tahu Claims Settlement Act 1998. A Statutory Acknowledgement enables Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu and any member of Ngāi Tahu Whānui to cite statutory acknowledgements as evidence of the association of Ngāi Tahu to the statutory areas.

For more detailed information:

[1] Rangatiratanga: dominion; chieftainship; right to exercise authority; chiefly autonomy; chiefly authority; ownership; leadership of a social group; domain of the rangatira; noble birth, attributes of a chief meaning authority or rule.

Kaitiakitanga: active protection, guardianship and use of and responsibility for natural and physical resources in the environment.

[2] This document should be read in support of the text in the technical area summaries.


Archaeology and heritage

The Replacement Christchurch District Plan identifies historic heritage places and settings which represent cultural and historic themes and activities of importance to the district. Significant historic heritage places with a high degree of authenticity and integrity are listed on a schedule and are subject to rules or provisions that protect them from inappropriate subdivision, use and development.

Archsite is the national inventory of archaeological sites for New Zealand. It incorporates information from the New Zealand Archaeological Association’s Site Recording Scheme. This is a “live” inventory that up-dates as new data is fed in from archaeologists working in the field. The data includes archaeological sites, known archaeological areas and indicative archaeological areas.


For more detailed information for eight areas below, see the Initial Heritage Assessments prepared by Heritage New Zealand Pouhere Taonga.

There is also some information in the technical area summaries on our land information page.