Draft OARC Regeneration Plan - 1: About this plan

Artist impression of the Otakaro Avon River Corridor

The Ōtākaro/Avon River forms an enduring foundation of life in Ōtautahi/Christchurch. As a source of mahinga kai for early Ngāi Tūāhuriri and colonial pioneers, and as a transport system, the Ōtākaro/Avon River binds our memories, and our futures together.

Following on from the devastation of the earthquakes, the 602-hectare Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor, set in the heart of east Christchurch, provides the opportunity to support the regeneration of the land, river and communities.


The draft Regeneration Plan

The draft Regeneration Plan provides guidance about the future of the Regeneration Area. In particular:

  • Residents living within and near the Regeneration Area need to understand how the land will be used in the immediate future and in the long term.
  • Manawhenua need to know how their interests are provided for, including the exercise of tino rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga.
  • Infrastructure providers, including the Christchurch City Council, need to be able to plan for effective and efficient repair and improvement of infrastructure.
  • The wider community, including the private sector, not for profit sector, social enterprise and philanthropists, need to know what the Regeneration Area might look like so they can make investment decisions.

The draft Regeneration Plan has been developed using the best available information on the challenges and opportunities of the existing environment. It enables future uses to be considered alongside broader regeneration, infrastructure, hazard avoidance and mitigation requirements.

The broad vision for the Regeneration Area is to provide opportunities for multiple uses within a predominantly natural environment and show how those opportunities can create a new, integrated ecosystem. Foremost, it is a place of connection with each other, with nature and with new possibilities.


Structure of the Plan

Following this introductory section, which sets out the context and importance of the area, the draft Regeneration Plan contains three chapters.

Chapter 1: Vision and Objectives

The Vision and Objectives articulate how regeneration would look within the area.

This chapter explains the Vision and Objectives that have driven the development of the draft Regeneration Plan and will continue to provide overarching direction and guidance to shape regeneration. Adoption of this Regeneration Plan will confirm the Vision and Objectives as the touchstones for future land use decisions – giving a strong sense to the community of how future decisions will be made to ensure the best outcomes.

Chapter 2: A View for the Future

This chapter illustrates how the opportunities presented by regeneration of the area could be realised. The Spatial Plans show a combination of land uses, projects and activities that, if implemented with the right balance, would positively realise the Vision and contribute to the Objectives over time.

Chapter 3: Transformation over Time

Regeneration will be achieved through sustained and co-ordinated effort by the public sector, manawhenua, community and investors. This chapter provides high-level guidance on the process for successfully regenerating the area progressively over decades. The process of first focusing on planning, then activation, gives an indication of when and where parties can be involved in the dynamic process of regeneration and how the area will evolve over time.


Making the Plan a reality

Achieving the Vision will require long-term investment and commitment from multiple parties. Some investment will come from the private, community, not for profit and philanthropic sectors. It is expected, however, that those meeting most of the costs of regeneration will be the people who will benefit from it – the current and future residents of Christchurch and citizens of New Zealand.

At this stage, some infrastructure funding has been set aside in the Christchurch City Council’s 2018 Long Term Plan (LTP) and further investment is possible from the Christchurch Regeneration Acceleration Facility. The Crown and Council need to decide whether to invest further through their respective budget processes.

To successfully regenerate the area, the following elements will require funding:

  • Land title amalgamation, infrastructure clearance and contaminated soil management – Before development in an area can begin, it may be necessary to amalgamate land titles, remove unnecessary infrastructure and remediate contamination. The cost of these activities is forecast within a range of $58 to $113 million (expected cost: $83 million).
  • Network infrastructure (stopbanks, stormwater management, transport) – Network infrastructure will provide the foundation for regeneration of the land. The cost is forecast within a range of $369 to $470 million (expected cost: $419 million) of which $137 million is budgeted in the Councils 2018 Long Term Plan (LTP), and a further $271 million is identified in its 2018 30-year infrastructure strategy. The Council’s LTP shows physical work commencing in 2021 for transport, 2023 for flood management and 2027 for stormwater management.
  • The Green Spine – the total cost of elements within the Green Spine is forecast within a range of $182 to $250 million (expected cost: $211 million). This includes the City to Sea path and other trails, landings, Cultural Trail, ecological restoration, community gathering places and reserves, along with footbridges and river widening for water sports. These may align with Government initiatives such as the Christchurch Regeneration Acceleration Facility and the Crown’s One Billion Trees programme. Philanthropic funding opportunities also exist.
  • The Reaches – The Reaches are places where complementary activities can take place with opportunities for private, social enterprise, or not for profit investment although it is likely that public sector funding will be needed for natural landscape and public realm work. Total investment will depend on the final mix of uses and activities. These public works are not currently defined or funded.
  • Operation and maintenance – At present, the Crown and Council are paying for servicing, asset management, land and property maintenance, and security in the Regeneration Area. Outside the scope of this draft Plan, the Crown and Council will decide the ongoing responsibility for funding and delivering these activities, along with an approach to transitional land uses that includes ways to reduce this expenditure.

The Ōtākaro/Avon River has always held a special place in the hearts of the people of Ōtautahi/Christchurch and people will continue to celebrate its wonderful character and heritage as the long-term Vision begins to materialise.

The Ōtākaro/Avon River forms an enduring foundation of life in Ōtautahi/Christchurch. As a source of mahinga kai for early Ngāi Tūāhuriri and colonial pioneers, and as a transport system, the Ōtākaro/Avon River binds our memories, and our futures together.

Following on from the devastation of the earthquakes, the 602-hectare Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor, set in the heart of east Christchurch, provides the opportunity to support the regeneration of the land, river and communities.


The draft Regeneration Plan

The draft Regeneration Plan provides guidance about the future of the Regeneration Area. In particular:

  • Residents living within and near the Regeneration Area need to understand how the land will be used in the immediate future and in the long term.
  • Manawhenua need to know how their interests are provided for, including the exercise of tino rangatiratanga and kaitiakitanga.
  • Infrastructure providers, including the Christchurch City Council, need to be able to plan for effective and efficient repair and improvement of infrastructure.
  • The wider community, including the private sector, not for profit sector, social enterprise and philanthropists, need to know what the Regeneration Area might look like so they can make investment decisions.

The draft Regeneration Plan has been developed using the best available information on the challenges and opportunities of the existing environment. It enables future uses to be considered alongside broader regeneration, infrastructure, hazard avoidance and mitigation requirements.

The broad vision for the Regeneration Area is to provide opportunities for multiple uses within a predominantly natural environment and show how those opportunities can create a new, integrated ecosystem. Foremost, it is a place of connection with each other, with nature and with new possibilities.


Structure of the Plan

Following this introductory section, which sets out the context and importance of the area, the draft Regeneration Plan contains three chapters.

Chapter 1: Vision and Objectives

The Vision and Objectives articulate how regeneration would look within the area.

This chapter explains the Vision and Objectives that have driven the development of the draft Regeneration Plan and will continue to provide overarching direction and guidance to shape regeneration. Adoption of this Regeneration Plan will confirm the Vision and Objectives as the touchstones for future land use decisions – giving a strong sense to the community of how future decisions will be made to ensure the best outcomes.

Chapter 2: A View for the Future

This chapter illustrates how the opportunities presented by regeneration of the area could be realised. The Spatial Plans show a combination of land uses, projects and activities that, if implemented with the right balance, would positively realise the Vision and contribute to the Objectives over time.

Chapter 3: Transformation over Time

Regeneration will be achieved through sustained and co-ordinated effort by the public sector, manawhenua, community and investors. This chapter provides high-level guidance on the process for successfully regenerating the area progressively over decades. The process of first focusing on planning, then activation, gives an indication of when and where parties can be involved in the dynamic process of regeneration and how the area will evolve over time.


Making the Plan a reality

Achieving the Vision will require long-term investment and commitment from multiple parties. Some investment will come from the private, community, not for profit and philanthropic sectors. It is expected, however, that those meeting most of the costs of regeneration will be the people who will benefit from it – the current and future residents of Christchurch and citizens of New Zealand.

At this stage, some infrastructure funding has been set aside in the Christchurch City Council’s 2018 Long Term Plan (LTP) and further investment is possible from the Christchurch Regeneration Acceleration Facility. The Crown and Council need to decide whether to invest further through their respective budget processes.

To successfully regenerate the area, the following elements will require funding:

  • Land title amalgamation, infrastructure clearance and contaminated soil management – Before development in an area can begin, it may be necessary to amalgamate land titles, remove unnecessary infrastructure and remediate contamination. The cost of these activities is forecast within a range of $58 to $113 million (expected cost: $83 million).
  • Network infrastructure (stopbanks, stormwater management, transport) – Network infrastructure will provide the foundation for regeneration of the land. The cost is forecast within a range of $369 to $470 million (expected cost: $419 million) of which $137 million is budgeted in the Councils 2018 Long Term Plan (LTP), and a further $271 million is identified in its 2018 30-year infrastructure strategy. The Council’s LTP shows physical work commencing in 2021 for transport, 2023 for flood management and 2027 for stormwater management.
  • The Green Spine – the total cost of elements within the Green Spine is forecast within a range of $182 to $250 million (expected cost: $211 million). This includes the City to Sea path and other trails, landings, Cultural Trail, ecological restoration, community gathering places and reserves, along with footbridges and river widening for water sports. These may align with Government initiatives such as the Christchurch Regeneration Acceleration Facility and the Crown’s One Billion Trees programme. Philanthropic funding opportunities also exist.
  • The Reaches – The Reaches are places where complementary activities can take place with opportunities for private, social enterprise, or not for profit investment although it is likely that public sector funding will be needed for natural landscape and public realm work. Total investment will depend on the final mix of uses and activities. These public works are not currently defined or funded.
  • Operation and maintenance – At present, the Crown and Council are paying for servicing, asset management, land and property maintenance, and security in the Regeneration Area. Outside the scope of this draft Plan, the Crown and Council will decide the ongoing responsibility for funding and delivering these activities, along with an approach to transitional land uses that includes ways to reduce this expenditure.

The Ōtākaro/Avon River has always held a special place in the hearts of the people of Ōtautahi/Christchurch and people will continue to celebrate its wonderful character and heritage as the long-term Vision begins to materialise.