Draft OARC Regeneration Plan - 3: The Green Spine

An Asian family looking at native New Zealand forest.

The Green Spine forms the core of the Regeneration Area. About eleven kilometres long and extending up to 150 metres on both sides of the river, it provides the thread that brings the area together.

An emphasis on the restoration of native habitats and the provision of infrastructure for walking and cycling means that the Green Spine will have a predominantly natural character with recreational opportunities.

Development of the Green Spine will enable enduring public access to the river, which in turn will stimulate a sense of community stewardship of the area.

Provision for a new City to Sea path would provide pedestrian and cycle access along the Green Spine, and lateral pathways and four footbridges would reconnect communities with the area. A Cultural Trail following the City to Sea path would provide insights into the social, cultural and environmental heritage of this land.

Eight landings located at regular intervals would provide seating, picnic and barbecue areas to encourage people to meet up and enjoy time near the river using recreation and community places spaced along the City to Sea path. In addition, widening of the river to create a local regatta course would provide better conditions for water sports.

A diagram showing the key liinkages, landings and activity areas in the Green Spine

Provision of stopbanks and stormwater treatment areas would provide an essential service to the wider community and the environment through improved flood protection and enhanced water quality.

The mahinga kai framework should guide the design of the Green Spine and bind ecological, social and educational outcomes in a holistic, cohesive way. Up to 80% of the Green Spine could be set aside for ecological restoration and over time this green space will become a treasured asset and a core part of the identity of the city.

A detailed graphic of the Green Spine area


Summary of the concept for the area

  • Landscape character changes from residential character (pre-earthquakes) to open parkland (existing post-earthquakes) to proposed predominantly native restoration.
  • Extensive ecological restoration provides a range of native habitats and stormwater treatment areas.
  • Network of stopbanks are terraced into the landscape providing improved flood protection for surrounding residential areas.
  • A new City to Sea path and Cultural Trail along the river provide for greater recreational opportunities and celebration of heritage values.
  • Four new footbridges and shared paths connect communities across the river and with the City to Sea path.
  • Eight landings are placed at regular intervals as well as parks and spaces for community connection.
  • Proposed edge housing provides passive surveillance to improve edge conditions where required.
  • Proposed areas for trial and adaptive housing.
  • A widening of the river near Kerrs Reach to provide training and regattas for flatwater sports.

The Green Spine forms the core of the Regeneration Area. About eleven kilometres long and extending up to 150 metres on both sides of the river, it provides the thread that brings the area together.

An emphasis on the restoration of native habitats and the provision of infrastructure for walking and cycling means that the Green Spine will have a predominantly natural character with recreational opportunities.

Development of the Green Spine will enable enduring public access to the river, which in turn will stimulate a sense of community stewardship of the area.

Provision for a new City to Sea path would provide pedestrian and cycle access along the Green Spine, and lateral pathways and four footbridges would reconnect communities with the area. A Cultural Trail following the City to Sea path would provide insights into the social, cultural and environmental heritage of this land.

Eight landings located at regular intervals would provide seating, picnic and barbecue areas to encourage people to meet up and enjoy time near the river using recreation and community places spaced along the City to Sea path. In addition, widening of the river to create a local regatta course would provide better conditions for water sports.

A diagram showing the key liinkages, landings and activity areas in the Green Spine

Provision of stopbanks and stormwater treatment areas would provide an essential service to the wider community and the environment through improved flood protection and enhanced water quality.

The mahinga kai framework should guide the design of the Green Spine and bind ecological, social and educational outcomes in a holistic, cohesive way. Up to 80% of the Green Spine could be set aside for ecological restoration and over time this green space will become a treasured asset and a core part of the identity of the city.

A detailed graphic of the Green Spine area


Summary of the concept for the area

  • Landscape character changes from residential character (pre-earthquakes) to open parkland (existing post-earthquakes) to proposed predominantly native restoration.
  • Extensive ecological restoration provides a range of native habitats and stormwater treatment areas.
  • Network of stopbanks are terraced into the landscape providing improved flood protection for surrounding residential areas.
  • A new City to Sea path and Cultural Trail along the river provide for greater recreational opportunities and celebration of heritage values.
  • Four new footbridges and shared paths connect communities across the river and with the City to Sea path.
  • Eight landings are placed at regular intervals as well as parks and spaces for community connection.
  • Proposed edge housing provides passive surveillance to improve edge conditions where required.
  • Proposed areas for trial and adaptive housing.
  • A widening of the river near Kerrs Reach to provide training and regattas for flatwater sports.