Draft OARC Regeneration Plan - 3: The preferred land uses

Aerial photo of the Horseshoe Lake reach of the Regeneration Area

The purpose of identifying preferred land uses and activities is to demonstrate the combination of activities that would realise the Vision and contribute to the Objectives for the Regeneration Area over time.

While these preferred land uses and activities provide guidance about how regeneration could occur in the area, it is acknowledged that these may not be the only potential land uses. Other potentially suitable land uses may be considered appropriate by the landowner, provided they achieve the Vision and Objectives, and do not inhibit the ability of the preferred land uses to establish, and support regeneration of the area.

Technical and commercial assessments, as well as substantial public engagement and research, contributed to the identification of preferred land uses and activities through a multi-criteria analysis process. These were assessed as:

  • Being in keeping with the Vision and
    Objectives for the area.
  • Reflecting community aspirations.
  • Being technically suitable for the land and sympathetic to environmental conditions.

The planning provisions set out in Appendix 1 generally provide for the establishment of the preferred land uses, either as permitted activities or, where there is a need to consider the potential range of environmental effects associated with them, via a consenting pathway. Recognising that regeneration is a dynamic and enabling process, the planning provisions also provide a consenting pathway to consider other potential land uses that may arise in the future. The preferred land uses and activities are the culmination of considerable technical analysis and consultation that can be used to guide the landowners’ decisions about projects and proposals, and provide a sense of the opportunities that would best contribute to the regeneration of the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.

Because the regeneration of this area is a long-term project, it is also likely that the needs of the city will change over time and ideas and proposals for new and unanticipated uses and activities will emerge. It is intended that these new opportunities can be assessed by the landowner and incorporated if they fit within the assessment criteria above.

The planning provisions set out in Appendix 1 allow for consideration of such activities and land uses provided they align with the anticipated District Plan outcomes that build on the Vision and Objectives of the Regeneration Plan.

Preferred land uses and activities

The land uses and activities listed below are considered desirable within the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor, with investment from public and private sectors, as well as the community and philanthropic and not for profit sectors. The descriptions of the Green Spine and Reaches that follow provide a general understanding as to how these activities may be arranged spatially.

Ecological and mahinga kai restoration opportunities include:

  • Fenced or unfenced eco-sanctuaries and large-scale habitat restoration.
  • Cultural planting and harvesting areas.
  • Environmental education facilities.

Public infrastructure opportunities include:

  • Stopbanks and pumping stations to mitigate flood hazards.
  • Detention ponds and wetlands to improve stormwater quality.
  • Multi-modal transport infrastructure including pedestrian and cycle paths, bridges, footbridges, carparks, road connections and public transport.

Recreation, sport and community opportunities include:

  • Physical exercise and leisure amenities such as cycling, running and fitness courses, a bridle path, kayak hire, sports grounds, sculpture, cultural and heritage trails.
  • Landings, viewing platforms and jetties.
  • Natural and built playgrounds, treehouses, flying foxes, picnic and barbecue areas.
  • Community spaces such as dog parks, community gardens, youth and community centres, educational facilities and amphitheatres.
  • Widening and deepening of the river in some locations for flatwater sports regattas and training.

Farming and food-based opportunities include:

  • Small to medium-sized commercial farming such as forestry, baleage, aquaculture of native species and arable farming.
  • Boutique horticulture and market gardens.
  • Community-based urban farms, community gardens and food forests.
  • Cafes, bars and restaurants including ‘plot to plate’ destinations.

Accommodation opportunities include:

  • Camping facilities.
  • Limited areas of small-scale housing connecting the edges of existing communities.
  • Adaptable, floating and amphibious housing.

Visitor attraction opportunities include:

  • Small-scale hospitality, hire and retail outlets.
  • Unique transportation offerings such as a gondola, river shuttle, autonomous vehicle, or tram.
  • Ticketed attractions such as whitewater, surf or cable wakeboard parks, mahinga kai and whare wānanga experiences, and ecotourism ventures.

The purpose of identifying preferred land uses and activities is to demonstrate the combination of activities that would realise the Vision and contribute to the Objectives for the Regeneration Area over time.

While these preferred land uses and activities provide guidance about how regeneration could occur in the area, it is acknowledged that these may not be the only potential land uses. Other potentially suitable land uses may be considered appropriate by the landowner, provided they achieve the Vision and Objectives, and do not inhibit the ability of the preferred land uses to establish, and support regeneration of the area.

Technical and commercial assessments, as well as substantial public engagement and research, contributed to the identification of preferred land uses and activities through a multi-criteria analysis process. These were assessed as:

  • Being in keeping with the Vision and
    Objectives for the area.
  • Reflecting community aspirations.
  • Being technically suitable for the land and sympathetic to environmental conditions.

The planning provisions set out in Appendix 1 generally provide for the establishment of the preferred land uses, either as permitted activities or, where there is a need to consider the potential range of environmental effects associated with them, via a consenting pathway. Recognising that regeneration is a dynamic and enabling process, the planning provisions also provide a consenting pathway to consider other potential land uses that may arise in the future. The preferred land uses and activities are the culmination of considerable technical analysis and consultation that can be used to guide the landowners’ decisions about projects and proposals, and provide a sense of the opportunities that would best contribute to the regeneration of the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor.

Because the regeneration of this area is a long-term project, it is also likely that the needs of the city will change over time and ideas and proposals for new and unanticipated uses and activities will emerge. It is intended that these new opportunities can be assessed by the landowner and incorporated if they fit within the assessment criteria above.

The planning provisions set out in Appendix 1 allow for consideration of such activities and land uses provided they align with the anticipated District Plan outcomes that build on the Vision and Objectives of the Regeneration Plan.

Preferred land uses and activities

The land uses and activities listed below are considered desirable within the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor, with investment from public and private sectors, as well as the community and philanthropic and not for profit sectors. The descriptions of the Green Spine and Reaches that follow provide a general understanding as to how these activities may be arranged spatially.

Ecological and mahinga kai restoration opportunities include:

  • Fenced or unfenced eco-sanctuaries and large-scale habitat restoration.
  • Cultural planting and harvesting areas.
  • Environmental education facilities.

Public infrastructure opportunities include:

  • Stopbanks and pumping stations to mitigate flood hazards.
  • Detention ponds and wetlands to improve stormwater quality.
  • Multi-modal transport infrastructure including pedestrian and cycle paths, bridges, footbridges, carparks, road connections and public transport.

Recreation, sport and community opportunities include:

  • Physical exercise and leisure amenities such as cycling, running and fitness courses, a bridle path, kayak hire, sports grounds, sculpture, cultural and heritage trails.
  • Landings, viewing platforms and jetties.
  • Natural and built playgrounds, treehouses, flying foxes, picnic and barbecue areas.
  • Community spaces such as dog parks, community gardens, youth and community centres, educational facilities and amphitheatres.
  • Widening and deepening of the river in some locations for flatwater sports regattas and training.

Farming and food-based opportunities include:

  • Small to medium-sized commercial farming such as forestry, baleage, aquaculture of native species and arable farming.
  • Boutique horticulture and market gardens.
  • Community-based urban farms, community gardens and food forests.
  • Cafes, bars and restaurants including ‘plot to plate’ destinations.

Accommodation opportunities include:

  • Camping facilities.
  • Limited areas of small-scale housing connecting the edges of existing communities.
  • Adaptable, floating and amphibious housing.

Visitor attraction opportunities include:

  • Small-scale hospitality, hire and retail outlets.
  • Unique transportation offerings such as a gondola, river shuttle, autonomous vehicle, or tram.
  • Ticketed attractions such as whitewater, surf or cable wakeboard parks, mahinga kai and whare wānanga experiences, and ecotourism ventures.