Draft OARC Regeneration Plan - 4: Phase 3: Secure the future

Restoring identity through mahinga kai planting

LONG TERM

Purpose of this phase

The Vision and Objectives will start to become a reality as Phase 3 builds on the public sector investment made in Phases 1 and 2. The platform created through strong governance and implementation, the investment in infrastructure, activation and ecological restoration provides an attractive proposition for private sector, community and philanthropic investors to develop the Regeneration Area at scale.

What can you expect?

Over Phase 3, the richness of the regeneration Vision “for the river to connect us together – with each other, with nature and with new possibilities” will become ever more apparent. The discrete pockets of development in Phase 2 will start to meld with new areas of development to create more coherent, complete spaces. As the benefits of regeneration become visible, the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor will become a significant and treasured community asset and a strong part of the city’s identity.

A more established ecosystem with maturing plantings could provide visitors with a range of experiences from bird-watching in the salt marshes of the Eastern Reaches to observing tuna (eels) in the management areas of the Horseshoe Lake Reach. The restored native habitat would by now support significantly more flora and fauna and the completed stormwater management areas will have reduced the discharge of contaminants into the Ōtākaro/Avon River, improving water quality and encouraging the return of mahinga kai. The effects of the regenerated habitat will be increasingly visible through more abundant birdlife in surrounding neighbourhoods and across the city.

A network of community, sporting and recreational spaces will provide locals and visitors with unique leisure experiences in different parts of the Regeneration Area. Surrounding neighbourhoods such as Dallington, Avonside and Burwood could become more integrated with the Regeneration Area through edge housing and common spaces such as natural playgrounds, orchards, and areas for young people to spend time together, which in turn will strengthen communities.

Increasing numbers of visitors will be attracted by the unique identity and range of activities offered within the Green Spine and Reaches. A new east–west road bridge, improving the connection between the city and the Regeneration Area, would make access to the area easier, and walking, cycling, parking and public transport options would cater for a variety of transport users.

More resilient infrastructure will support eastern communities and the city as we adapt to the challenges of natural hazards and climate change.

The regeneration activities should have encouraged investment both within the area and in the nearby activity centres such as Shirley, Linwood and New Brighton. This investment should be starting to increase employment opportunities, benefiting young people as well as those living in east Christchurch.

As the zeitgeist of the area emerges, the environment, neighbouring communities and the economy will continue to flourish.

An example of how activity, stopbanks, wetlands and terracing could be integrated together

What needs to be done?

Restore identity
The regeneration and management of indigenous habitat and species is a process that will continue for generations to come. By Phase 3, significant tracts of the corridor will be covered in native vegetation, with slow-growing trees such as kahikatea and tōtara starting to assert their presence and provide habitat for new and reintroduced native species.

The principles of mahinga kai that are integral to this draft Regeneration Plan will now be producing multiple benefits – ranging from kaitiakitanga (creating a more resilient environment) to hauora (promoting wellbeing) and ultimately whakapapa (strengthening our sense of identity and relationship with the natural world). Phase 3 provides an opportunity to celebrate and build on this restored identity and gain a deeper understanding of the opportunities it provides.

Develop roading and bridges
A new east–west bridge should be constructed to improve access between New Brighton Road and Breezes Road, increasing connections between the eastern suburbs and the rest of the city. State Highway 74 could be realigned onto higher ground following the rebuild of Anzac Drive bridge to provide a more resilient network and improved access from the river corridor to Avondale and Aranui.

Completion of the replacement footbridges would strengthen the connection between river communities. Reoriented public transport would cater for the greater use of the Regeneration Area and completed carparks will also be encouraging visitors.

Complete the network of community spaces
Completion of the network of community spaces would link existing spaces outside the Regeneration Area with newly created spaces through a series of trails and connections.

Widen Kerrs Reach: Further widening of the Ōtākaro/Avon River at Kerrs Reach to about 80 metres would establish a 1,000-metre course for water sports users that is suitable for local regattas.

Develop the Reaches further
Private sector, community and not for profit investment in the three Reaches should build momentum, with the distinct character of each Reach providing unique experiences for locals and visitors.

Complete the infrastructure programme and the Green Spine
The final phases of delivery of the stormwater management areas, stopbanks, footbridges, trails and paths would build on the City to Sea path and landings established in Phase 2 to provide a fully realised base for the regeneration of the area.

By Phase 3 the more detailed features of the Green Spine could be completed, bringing greater character and definition to the Regeneration Area. The Cultural Trail could include a sculpture park as a destination for art lovers; highly designed landings, jetties and footbridges could showcase traditional Ngāi Tūāhuriri art and reflect the distinctive identities of neighbouring communities; and these features could be embedded within established plantings that are supporting species such as kererū, tītapu (bellbird) and kōtare (kingfisher).

Previously disconnected elements of the Regeneration Area should now feel integrated through strong design. For example, nearby housing, stopbanks, pumping stations and wetlands could be integrated through a series of landscaped terraces. Planting these terraces with native vegetation would buffer flood events and protect the stopbanks while also improving water quality and creating spaces for recreational activity.

LONG TERM

Purpose of this phase

The Vision and Objectives will start to become a reality as Phase 3 builds on the public sector investment made in Phases 1 and 2. The platform created through strong governance and implementation, the investment in infrastructure, activation and ecological restoration provides an attractive proposition for private sector, community and philanthropic investors to develop the Regeneration Area at scale.

What can you expect?

Over Phase 3, the richness of the regeneration Vision “for the river to connect us together – with each other, with nature and with new possibilities” will become ever more apparent. The discrete pockets of development in Phase 2 will start to meld with new areas of development to create more coherent, complete spaces. As the benefits of regeneration become visible, the Ōtākaro Avon River Corridor will become a significant and treasured community asset and a strong part of the city’s identity.

A more established ecosystem with maturing plantings could provide visitors with a range of experiences from bird-watching in the salt marshes of the Eastern Reaches to observing tuna (eels) in the management areas of the Horseshoe Lake Reach. The restored native habitat would by now support significantly more flora and fauna and the completed stormwater management areas will have reduced the discharge of contaminants into the Ōtākaro/Avon River, improving water quality and encouraging the return of mahinga kai. The effects of the regenerated habitat will be increasingly visible through more abundant birdlife in surrounding neighbourhoods and across the city.

A network of community, sporting and recreational spaces will provide locals and visitors with unique leisure experiences in different parts of the Regeneration Area. Surrounding neighbourhoods such as Dallington, Avonside and Burwood could become more integrated with the Regeneration Area through edge housing and common spaces such as natural playgrounds, orchards, and areas for young people to spend time together, which in turn will strengthen communities.

Increasing numbers of visitors will be attracted by the unique identity and range of activities offered within the Green Spine and Reaches. A new east–west road bridge, improving the connection between the city and the Regeneration Area, would make access to the area easier, and walking, cycling, parking and public transport options would cater for a variety of transport users.

More resilient infrastructure will support eastern communities and the city as we adapt to the challenges of natural hazards and climate change.

The regeneration activities should have encouraged investment both within the area and in the nearby activity centres such as Shirley, Linwood and New Brighton. This investment should be starting to increase employment opportunities, benefiting young people as well as those living in east Christchurch.

As the zeitgeist of the area emerges, the environment, neighbouring communities and the economy will continue to flourish.

An example of how activity, stopbanks, wetlands and terracing could be integrated together

What needs to be done?

Restore identity
The regeneration and management of indigenous habitat and species is a process that will continue for generations to come. By Phase 3, significant tracts of the corridor will be covered in native vegetation, with slow-growing trees such as kahikatea and tōtara starting to assert their presence and provide habitat for new and reintroduced native species.

The principles of mahinga kai that are integral to this draft Regeneration Plan will now be producing multiple benefits – ranging from kaitiakitanga (creating a more resilient environment) to hauora (promoting wellbeing) and ultimately whakapapa (strengthening our sense of identity and relationship with the natural world). Phase 3 provides an opportunity to celebrate and build on this restored identity and gain a deeper understanding of the opportunities it provides.

Develop roading and bridges
A new east–west bridge should be constructed to improve access between New Brighton Road and Breezes Road, increasing connections between the eastern suburbs and the rest of the city. State Highway 74 could be realigned onto higher ground following the rebuild of Anzac Drive bridge to provide a more resilient network and improved access from the river corridor to Avondale and Aranui.

Completion of the replacement footbridges would strengthen the connection between river communities. Reoriented public transport would cater for the greater use of the Regeneration Area and completed carparks will also be encouraging visitors.

Complete the network of community spaces
Completion of the network of community spaces would link existing spaces outside the Regeneration Area with newly created spaces through a series of trails and connections.

Widen Kerrs Reach: Further widening of the Ōtākaro/Avon River at Kerrs Reach to about 80 metres would establish a 1,000-metre course for water sports users that is suitable for local regattas.

Develop the Reaches further
Private sector, community and not for profit investment in the three Reaches should build momentum, with the distinct character of each Reach providing unique experiences for locals and visitors.

Complete the infrastructure programme and the Green Spine
The final phases of delivery of the stormwater management areas, stopbanks, footbridges, trails and paths would build on the City to Sea path and landings established in Phase 2 to provide a fully realised base for the regeneration of the area.

By Phase 3 the more detailed features of the Green Spine could be completed, bringing greater character and definition to the Regeneration Area. The Cultural Trail could include a sculpture park as a destination for art lovers; highly designed landings, jetties and footbridges could showcase traditional Ngāi Tūāhuriri art and reflect the distinctive identities of neighbouring communities; and these features could be embedded within established plantings that are supporting species such as kererū, tītapu (bellbird) and kōtare (kingfisher).

Previously disconnected elements of the Regeneration Area should now feel integrated through strong design. For example, nearby housing, stopbanks, pumping stations and wetlands could be integrated through a series of landscaped terraces. Planting these terraces with native vegetation would buffer flood events and protect the stopbanks while also improving water quality and creating spaces for recreational activity.