Information about Southshore and South New Brighton

In order to consider and develop a strategy for the future, it’s important that everyone has access to the technical information, data and mapping, as well as cultural, environmental and historical knowledge that’s available for the area.

This information isn’t new – it comes from a variety of previously published sources – but we’re bringing it all together here on our website and in hard copy at the Coastal Futures Hub (82 Estuary Road) to make it easy for people to access.

This information uses the internationally agreed best science data for climate change available at the moment and applies it to the local area. We know the data will change over time as new and updated information becomes available. We also know that, particularly with climate change information, we are dealing with a lot of uncertainty and not all people agree with climate change projections. We don’t know when change will reach a certain threshold, and what the extent of the changes will be.

However, this information is a starting point for the conversation about actions for how this area can adapt to the effects of climate change and have a positive, viable and certain future. Coming up with the actions to address the potential effects of climate change, and working out when they need to occur is called ‘adaptive planning’ and it’s what the Regeneration Strategy is all about.

Other communities will have the same kinds of conversations in the coming years, because climate change, including sea level rise, affects other areas in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula. However, Southshore and South New Brighton are the first because of the red zone, and Regenerate Christchurch’s role in planning for the future of that land.


How to find the information

Information about the area is divided into five parts – you can click on the links below or download PDFs from the sidebar.

Within each of the sections below you can follow links for further information and download fact sheets.


You can also help build our collective knowledge of the area by contributing your local knowledge and observations about the environment. Click on the Share Your Knowledge tab and drop a pin on the map, or visit us at the Community Hub at 82 Estuary Road.



In order to consider and develop a strategy for the future, it’s important that everyone has access to the technical information, data and mapping, as well as cultural, environmental and historical knowledge that’s available for the area.

This information isn’t new – it comes from a variety of previously published sources – but we’re bringing it all together here on our website and in hard copy at the Coastal Futures Hub (82 Estuary Road) to make it easy for people to access.

This information uses the internationally agreed best science data for climate change available at the moment and applies it to the local area. We know the data will change over time as new and updated information becomes available. We also know that, particularly with climate change information, we are dealing with a lot of uncertainty and not all people agree with climate change projections. We don’t know when change will reach a certain threshold, and what the extent of the changes will be.

However, this information is a starting point for the conversation about actions for how this area can adapt to the effects of climate change and have a positive, viable and certain future. Coming up with the actions to address the potential effects of climate change, and working out when they need to occur is called ‘adaptive planning’ and it’s what the Regeneration Strategy is all about.

Other communities will have the same kinds of conversations in the coming years, because climate change, including sea level rise, affects other areas in Christchurch and Banks Peninsula. However, Southshore and South New Brighton are the first because of the red zone, and Regenerate Christchurch’s role in planning for the future of that land.


How to find the information

Information about the area is divided into five parts – you can click on the links below or download PDFs from the sidebar.

Within each of the sections below you can follow links for further information and download fact sheets.


You can also help build our collective knowledge of the area by contributing your local knowledge and observations about the environment. Click on the Share Your Knowledge tab and drop a pin on the map, or visit us at the Community Hub at 82 Estuary Road.



  • Natural Environment

    8 months ago
    Snb wetland
    The natural environment is a huge part of the appeal of this area. The coastline, saltmarshes, open spaces and reserves are highly valued by Ngāi Tahu, residents and visitors. However, the factors that make this location so special also highlight some of its challenges. Read more.
    The natural environment is a huge part of the appeal of this area. The coastline, saltmarshes, open spaces and reserves are highly valued by Ngāi Tahu, residents and visitors. However, the factors that make this location so special also highlight some of its challenges. Read more.
  • Cultural Values - Te Ao Māori

    8 months ago
    Snb estuaryedge %28002%29

    A Cultural Values Report has been mandated by Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga and the Ihutai Trust and was commissioned by Regenerate Christchurch. Cultural values identified within the Report fall inside the ancestral lands and takiwā of Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga and the Ihutahi Trust mandated area of MR900.

    The Report describes concepts and values in Te Ao Māori (the Māori worldview) and the more specific values and interests associated with the geographic features, wāhi tapu, place names and archaeological sites within the Southshore and South New Brighton project area. This includes traditional history, occupation, mahinga kai and contemporary cultural associations. Read more.


    A Cultural Values Report has been mandated by Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga and the Ihutai Trust and was commissioned by Regenerate Christchurch. Cultural values identified within the Report fall inside the ancestral lands and takiwā of Te Ngāi Tūāhuriri Rūnanga and the Ihutahi Trust mandated area of MR900.

    The Report describes concepts and values in Te Ao Māori (the Māori worldview) and the more specific values and interests associated with the geographic features, wāhi tapu, place names and archaeological sites within the Southshore and South New Brighton project area. This includes traditional history, occupation, mahinga kai and contemporary cultural associations. Read more.


  • Human Environment

    8 months ago
    Snb picnictable

    The natural environment, sense of community, recreational opportunities and access to open spaces are all reasons given for why Southshore and South New Brighton are such great places to live.

    It is also an area of cultural significance for Ngāi Tahu and has a history of Māori settlement. Read more.

    The natural environment, sense of community, recreational opportunities and access to open spaces are all reasons given for why Southshore and South New Brighton are such great places to live.

    It is also an area of cultural significance for Ngāi Tahu and has a history of Māori settlement. Read more.

  • Natural Hazards

    8 months ago
    South new brighton

    Natural events happen all the time and make up the atmospheric, earth or water-related processes that shape the environment in which we live. They only become a hazard when they cause damage to the human environment - to property, to the economy and/ or to people. Read more.

    Natural events happen all the time and make up the atmospheric, earth or water-related processes that shape the environment in which we live. They only become a hazard when they cause damage to the human environment - to property, to the economy and/ or to people. Read more.

  • Framework for managing natural hazards and climate change

    8 months ago
    Snb pukeko

    A complex framework of international, national, regional and local regulatory and non-regulatory requirements and tools apply to management of natural hazard risk. This provides the legal foundation for building sustainable, hazard-resilient communities and provides the toolbox available to implement any response to avoid and mitigate hazard risks and adapt to the exacerbation of these risks due to climate change. Read more.

    A complex framework of international, national, regional and local regulatory and non-regulatory requirements and tools apply to management of natural hazard risk. This provides the legal foundation for building sustainable, hazard-resilient communities and provides the toolbox available to implement any response to avoid and mitigate hazard risks and adapt to the exacerbation of these risks due to climate change. Read more.