What is a Regeneration Strategy?

This regeneration strategy is more like an adaptation strategy. It is about developing short, medium and long-term options for Southshore and South New Brighton to adapt to climate change, including sea level rise. It will also address legacy earthquake issues such as the future of South New Brighton and Southshore’s red zone.

There are no preconceived ideas about what this regeneration strategy will look like.


What is the difference between a regeneration strategy and a regeneration plan?

Unlike a regeneration plan, a regeneration strategy does not have any statutory power under the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act. It is Regenerate Christchurch’s advice to the Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury, Ngāi Tahu, the Crown and the community.

However, it may lead to the development of a regeneration plan which does have legal power under the Act. The adaptive options and actions developed through the regeneration strategy could also inform the development of future changes to the Christchurch District Plan, including managing coastal hazards.


What is adaptive planning?

Adaptive planning is an approach recommended by the Ministry for the Environment. What makes this approach different is the way it deals with uncertainty and risk, and the way it places community engagement at the centre of the planning process.

The future of climate change is uncertain, but with adaptive planning the agreed course of action can change if need be – for example, if new climate change information becomes available. It also gives decision-makers a way to progress things and make decisions, even with uncertainty about the rate and effects of sea level rise.

Adaptive planning uses four climate scenarios based on guidance from the Minister for the Environment and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We can use the climate change scenarios to model the change and build a picture of what the impacts could look like. The scenarios are combined with local signals, or observations, to identify when pre-agreed actions are needed.

The process of developing the Regeneration Strategy gives you the opportunity to have input into assessing what level of risk is acceptable, tolerable and intolerable in the short, medium and long term, to help determine when decisions on the pre-agreed actions might be needed. A balance must be struck between the cost of impacts and the costs of adapting.


Why now?

We're doing this now because we want to have an agreed, proactive strategy for how we respond to the effects of climate change on Southshore and South New Brighton. Adaptive planning provides a level of certainty about how and when future actions will be required, yet it’s flexible enough to change with changing information.

Decisions made in the short-term may impact, or limit, decisions that need to be made later. It’s better to have a comprehensive conversation about this now, than react in a piecemeal way without a clear vision, full information or strong community involvement. Being prepared means having input from landowners,residents, business owners, community groups, special interest group as well as local and central government agencies.

This regeneration strategy is more like an adaptation strategy. It is about developing short, medium and long-term options for Southshore and South New Brighton to adapt to climate change, including sea level rise. It will also address legacy earthquake issues such as the future of South New Brighton and Southshore’s red zone.

There are no preconceived ideas about what this regeneration strategy will look like.


What is the difference between a regeneration strategy and a regeneration plan?

Unlike a regeneration plan, a regeneration strategy does not have any statutory power under the Greater Christchurch Regeneration Act. It is Regenerate Christchurch’s advice to the Christchurch City Council, Environment Canterbury, Ngāi Tahu, the Crown and the community.

However, it may lead to the development of a regeneration plan which does have legal power under the Act. The adaptive options and actions developed through the regeneration strategy could also inform the development of future changes to the Christchurch District Plan, including managing coastal hazards.


What is adaptive planning?

Adaptive planning is an approach recommended by the Ministry for the Environment. What makes this approach different is the way it deals with uncertainty and risk, and the way it places community engagement at the centre of the planning process.

The future of climate change is uncertain, but with adaptive planning the agreed course of action can change if need be – for example, if new climate change information becomes available. It also gives decision-makers a way to progress things and make decisions, even with uncertainty about the rate and effects of sea level rise.

Adaptive planning uses four climate scenarios based on guidance from the Minister for the Environment and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. We can use the climate change scenarios to model the change and build a picture of what the impacts could look like. The scenarios are combined with local signals, or observations, to identify when pre-agreed actions are needed.

The process of developing the Regeneration Strategy gives you the opportunity to have input into assessing what level of risk is acceptable, tolerable and intolerable in the short, medium and long term, to help determine when decisions on the pre-agreed actions might be needed. A balance must be struck between the cost of impacts and the costs of adapting.


Why now?

We're doing this now because we want to have an agreed, proactive strategy for how we respond to the effects of climate change on Southshore and South New Brighton. Adaptive planning provides a level of certainty about how and when future actions will be required, yet it’s flexible enough to change with changing information.

Decisions made in the short-term may impact, or limit, decisions that need to be made later. It’s better to have a comprehensive conversation about this now, than react in a piecemeal way without a clear vision, full information or strong community involvement. Being prepared means having input from landowners,residents, business owners, community groups, special interest group as well as local and central government agencies.